Tuesday, 31 December 2002

Choose 80's Dance - Album Review

As you begin to read this article, you're probably starting to wonder "what the hell is this? What is Julian Radbourne, self-confessed heavy rock fan, doing buying a dance music CD?"

Okay, you got me there. At the moment there are loads of rock albums I would love to buy - Nirvana, Santana, the Rolling Stones, the Who, Tenacious D, and probably a few more as well.

So what the hell am I doing buying a CD filled with 80's dance music? The truth of the matter is this - as well as listening to the likes of Deep Purple, Rainbow, Magnum and Black Sabbath from around 1982 onwards, I also enjoyed Wham, Cameo, Frankie Goes To Hollywood, and a few more as well.

When I picked up this album in my local Woolworths, and I looked at the track listings, I couldn't believe just how many 80's classics were on this thing. Wham's "Wake Me Up Before You Go-Go" may have been eclipsed by most of George Michael's later work, but how many of you thirtysomethings fail to raise even a slight smile when you hear this again?

Falco's "Rock Me Amadeus" may have been just one of those summer novelty hits from the European mainland, but it was still great fun.

Cameo's "Word Up" gave us THAT codpiece, but the video also featured a young LeVar Burton, later to find fame as the blind Geordi LaForge in Star Trek: The Next Generation.

Two classics from Frankie in "Relax" and "Two Tribes" were highly controversial at the time. Compared to some of today's stuff, they seem quite tame.

Tone Loc's "Funky Cold Medina" reminded us of a time when not all rap seemed to be about killing each other.

Paul Hardcastle's "19" was a definite political statement about the Vietnam war, but did anyone actually realise this?

Paula Abdul's "Straight Up" proved to be her best and most successful hit. A great 80's dance song.

While I admit I didn't exactly follow the 80's dance music scene as readily as I did other genres, I really enjoyed listening to this compilation. Almost every song in this collection invoked one memory or another. Listening to them was like visiting an old friend. I'd rather dance to this "old stuff" than the majority of the so-called dance music Radio 1 plays these days!

Boy do I sound old!!!!!